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Are you missing the opportunity to expand your reach?

Facebook as a Business Tool

In our last blog post, we focused on how to use Twitter responsibly. Much of the advice in that post similarly applies to using Facebook, so we recommend that you read it now if you have not done so already.

In this post, we are focusing more specifically on how to effectively use Facebook as a business tool. While the responsible use of all social media is important, Facebook is unique in that it may be used explicitly as a tool to grow your business. The following suggestions relate specifically to that capability.

Create the Proper Page

Dummy accounts are defined as accounts that do not represent real people. These accounts violate Facebook’s terms and conditions. They are illegal. It is that simple. Don’t use them. As well, you should not use a personal account for your business; instead, you should create a separate page. Whether you’re an author, a celebrity, or the CEO of an international corporation, create the right type of page for your needs. Take the time to develop the page properly, using graphics that match your website and incorporate your logo.

Complete the “About” Section

This section appears directly beneath your profile picture. This information is one of the first things people see when they find your account. Be sure to include information most relevant to prospective customers or clients – in practical terms, the Answer segment of a typical Q&A section without the Question segment.

Post with Reasonable Regularity

The adage, “out of sight; out of mind,” applies to Facebook. But for relatively small businesses, interactions per post drop dramatically when there is more than one post per day. Therefore, it is usually best to post no more than once or twice per day. Rather than quantity, focus on quality. Posting low-quality material is even worse than posting too often, so refrain from doing either. For genuine results, especially if you are just getting started and need to build a following, investing in Facebook ads (boosted posts and page ads) can help put your page in front of a targeted audience.

Post at the Right Times of the Day

In general, most Facebook analyses indicate that early afternoon (1:00-4:00 pm) is the best time for business posts to be viewed and shared. If you want to post twice on any given day, it usually is best to post right after lunch (1:00) and right before the end of the standard work day (4:30). If your business is mostly conducted after regular business hours (restaurants, bars, movie theaters, etc.), then the hours of 4:00-5:00 and 7:00-9:00 generally work best. The most effective times for you might vary slightly from the standards, but using these suggested times as your starting point is a good idea.

Use Videos and Multimedia

One of the distinguishing factors in well-regarded Facebook posts is a combination of traditional print and video material. Just as with other marketing efforts, Facebook is most powerful when it appeals to multiple senses. Of particular impact is inspirational video and the use of music, since those forms of media tap into emotion in a direct way. Research estimates put engagement about two to three times higher after the first month when multimedia is employed as opposed to when solely using print in your posts.

Respond within an Hour to Comments

Your social media participants (those who comment on your posts) can be separated into two groups: those who complain and those who don’t. You can’t eliminate all complaints, but you can minimize them with one policy: Respond to comments within an hour. That is the expectation of those who complain, and it will impress those who don’t.

To make sure you are able to do this, activate notifications when people comment. Have the notifications sent to two locations: to an email address that is dedicated to social media responses and to a work computer or mobile device, depending on your availability.

Use Facebook Analytic Tools

It is impossible to improve that which isn’t tracked, studied, and understood. The point of all marketing is continual improvement, so actively using Facebook without taking advantage of its analytic tools is foolish. The data available through these tools is invaluable, so use them to craft an intentional, comprehensive strategy that works for you and your business. Not only will they allow you to do more of what works, but they also will allow you to do less of what doesn’t work.

Along with these foundational suggestions, there are a number of Facebook features that can enhance your effectiveness. It is worth taking some time and looking into each one to see if you can use them in your social media strategy. They include the following:

  • Scheduled posts
  • Promoted posts
  • Hashtags
  • Places
  • Stock photography

Facebook still can be a powerful component of social media marketing, if it is implemented correctly. Done well, Facebook can reach customers and potential consumers in a unique way. It should not be used independently of other marketing measures; rather, it should be integrated into your overall marketing plan. There is much more that you can do to maximize Facebook effectively, but the suggestions and components in this post will give you a solid starting point – and they can launch your expanded use into deeper features.

Are you missing out on ONE TRILLION DOLLARS in potential growth?

DaSh factor Report: Why Every CEO Should be on Social Media

DaSh factor LLC has published a new report: Why Every CEO Should be on Social Media. CEOs, especially those in the B2B space, have shown a reluctance to embrace social media beyond the standard LinkedIn profile, but this report demonstrates the countless benefits afforded the CEO on social media.

CEOs on social media in B2B, B2C, and B2B2C provide the industry-specific, trust-based, personal interaction that customers seek.

The pressure for CEOs to be accessible on social media is growing; more than half of millennial B2B decision makers’ purchasing decisions are influenced by social media and more than 80% of B2B customers expect real-time interaction with the companies they do business with. CEOs on social media amplify the brand and lend credibility to the messaging.

This report details how CEOs on social media benefit from:

  • Increased customer engagement
  • Better brand awareness
  • Enhanced brand visibility
  • Credibility as thought leaders
  • Improved employee engagement

The report provides a guideline for getting started and examples of CEOs who are leveraging the power of social media to make a difference for themselves and their organizations.

Request a free copy of this new report from DaSh factor by subscribing below.

Get our free report, Why Every CEO Should be on Social Media, when you subscribe to our newsletter.

LinkedIn and Twitter Make Big Improvements

Hashtags on LinkedIn, Twitter Character Counts, and More!

Great new changes are rolling out on social media that will have a positive impact for many business users. We’re excited because of the way it allows us to achieve even better visibility for our clients.

What Do These Changes Mean?

All of these changes are designed to make it easier for you to engage with, share to, and reach more people. These are positive changes that will allow us to better amplify and magnify your visibility and enhance your digital footprint.

Read more below for details on the individual changes being rolled out to LinkedIn and Twitter:

LinkedIn Pulse: The New Format

The new LinkedIn publishing format is rolling out, and it gives publishers a lot more control over their content. What we love:

Header images can now be the full page width.

LI Header Image

You can toggle to the standard image if your image doesn’t work:

LI Header Image 2

However, the wider image provides much more flexibility for branding and visual magnificence!

LI header image 3

Other changes to the publishing experience on LinkedIn are just as great and possibly even more powerful in terms of increasing visibility. LinkedIn has made it easier to add images, video (supporting YouTube, Vimeo, and other platforms), and slideshows (supporting SlideShare, Prezi, and other platforms) right into the body of your articles. You can even embed a tweet easily, simply by adding the link:

linkedin twitter

Most importantly, LinkedIn is ending the requirement of using the three tags to categorize your article. The tag choices were often limited and narrowing, preventing the article from reaching its full audience. The tagging system is being replaced with a content- and hashtag-driven introduction:

publishing on linkedin

This brings us to the next fabulous change on LinkedIn:

LinkedIn Now Supports Hashtags

Hint: We’ve anticipated this change for some time and have used hashtags in our client posts regularly.

LinkedIn has finally given in: After removing support for hashtags in 2013 because of “poor response,” they’ve finally realized that hashtags are the most practical tool for making content searchable. It’s already been rolled out on the mobile app, with desktop support coming soon.

Twitter Updates Character Count Rules

In a move that completely delights us, Twitter will no longer count links or images as part of the 140-character restriction for tweets. They will also stop counting the characters of the user in a reply. This means we can craft even more exceptional messages without losing a good chunk of the space to an image or link. Twitter is also removing the requirement to add a . before a mention to make sure it is seen by all. (In the past, if you wanted to complain, say, about poor service at the Courtyard Marriott, and you wanted to make sure the whole world saw it, you would have to write .@CourtyardHotels, or it would be treated like a direct message and go only to the user.

courtyard tweet

Further enhancing the platform, Twitter is now allowing users to retweet and quote themselves, providing an opportunity to be more engaging. Read more on the Twitter blog.